Beware of Internet Security Essentials

Internet Security Essentials…sounds like a necessary thing to have for your computer.  It also sounds very familiar with another program called Microsoft Security Essentials which is a pretty good and free, legitimate anti-virus program.

However, Internet Security Essentials is quite different. Unlike Microsoft Security Essentials, it is a rouge program which you might notice at first as an annoying pop-up claiming to identify and clean your computer.  But what it really does is creep into your system to try and get you to purchase it by pretending to scan your system and identify different viruses.  Then it presents itself as the solution to all the problems it has identified.

This can be very convincing when you are trying to keep your records clean, and the small cost to purchase may seem logical.  However, since you did not permit this application to be loaded on your system, this should be the first sign that something doesn’t smell right.

If you try to ignore these pop-ups, chances are they will pop up again and again.  And with time it will prevent you from using the internet even though you have a good internet connection.  As time proceeds it will plant some real viruses in your system and make it harder to work with.  The quicker you deal with this pest, the better.

  1. Step one is to uninstall it from the Add/Remove Programs section in your Control Panel.
  2. Then go to Internet Explorer and choose Tools from menu, then Internet Options, then the Connections tab.
  3. From there click on the “LAN settings” button, then uncheck the box under “Proxy Server”, and make sure there is a check in the box above called “Automatically detect settings”.
  4. Click Ok to exit LAN settings, and Ok again to exit Internet Options.
  5. Restart your computer.  Things should work normal again.

MalwareBytes is a good scanner to run when this happens to clean out any other gremlins.  The quick scan in this program should do the trick.

As far as Microsoft Security Essentials, I recommend it for anyone with a faster and newer computer.

Hope this article was helpful.  I am available for any questions on Skype: patient.computer.tutor or email: [email protected]

Best of luck and good computing to all of you.

David Goes has more than 20 years of experience in the financial services and computer industry.  He holds a Bachelors degree in Computer Information Systems with cum laude designation.  His expertise is in providing computer solutions that deliver business value and personal efficiency through database management, computer optimization, and online marketing.

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Surfing the Net with Hyperlinks

Hyperlinks (links) are usually used within websites to give the reader more in-depth information on a particular topic.  However, links can also take you to another page on the current website or to an entirely new website, a different company, other article, or a promotional advert.

Let’s say you are on the internet reading an article.  As your scrolling down through the article you come across a link, which is a method of taking you to another location on the internet.  A link may look like text that is underlined, in bold, in a different color, or has a different font.  Here is an example: Patient Computer Tutor.  If you hover over this text with the mouse you will notice the mouse pointer turn into a hand to indicate that clicking on it will take you somewhere else.   Some browsers will show you, usually on the bottom left corner, the address where this link will take you.

Links can open up a new tab on the internet browser, or they can merely open up in the same tab that you are on.  Sometimes this is can be confusing, and you can lose track of a site you were reading.  It is important to keep track and see if the link that you clicked on takes you to a new tab or keeps you on the same tab.  If it keeps you on the same tab, then chances are you can get back to where you were before by merely clicking on your browser’s back button.

If it opened up in a new tab then all you have to do is click on the previous tab to get back to where you were.  This can be very frustrating to those getting started on surfing the world wide web, where an interesting article seemingly just disappears on them.

To insure that the link that you are pressing on opens up in a new window or tab just do the following steps.  You can practice by using the Patient Computer Tutor link above.  Here are the steps:

  1. Using the mouse, hover over the link.  The mouse pointer will turn into a hand.
  2. Once the hand appears, right click with the mouse.
  3. A small pop-up window will appear with several options.
  4. Choose “Open link in new tab.”
  5. The article will remain and a new tab will open with the new location.

Opening links individually with its own proper tab is like laying out different pages on a desk.  The tabs at the top represent where the pages are on the computer.

We hope this computer tip was helpful.  I am available for any questions on Skype: patient.computer.tutor or email: [email protected]

David Goes founded Patient Computer.  He has more than 20 years of experience in the financial services and computer industry.  David holds a Bachelors degree in Computer Information Systems with cum laude designation.  His expertise is in providing computer solutions that deliver business value and personal efficiency through database management, computer optimization, and online marketing.

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Computer Tip – Where are my Bookmarks?

It is important to back-up your bookmarks, especially when doing an upgrade.  This is a step that is often forgotten.

Creating a back-up of your bookmarks is easy to do.  Once your bookmarks are backed up, it will create a JSON file.

Here are the steps:

1. Install Mozilla Firefox and go through the steps.  Read my article on the reasons why it is better than Internet Explorer (IE).

2. Start up Mozilla Firefox.

3. Go to Bookmarks > Organize Bookmarks > Import and Backup > Restore > Choose File…

4.  Select the JSON file you backed up.

5. Click Yes to overwrite backup.

This also works if you are changing your web browser from IE to Mozilla in which Mozilla will find your favorites from IE.  But make sure you back up your bookmarks just in case.

I am available for any questions on Skype: patient.computer.tutor or email: [email protected]

David Goes has more than 20 years of experience in the financial services and computer industry.  He holds a Bachelors degree in Computer Information Systems with cum laude designation.  His expertise is in providing computer solutions that deliver business value and personal efficiency through database management, computer optimization, and online marketing.

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